September 13, 2020

What to Know: 7 Traits of Avoidant Personality Disorder, Processing Bad Memories, & Hoarding During COVID-19

by | Sep 13, 2020 | MedCircle Digest

This week, learn the signs and symptoms of avoidant personality disorder, the power of EMDR, and how dance and movement can be used as a therapeutic practice.

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This Week’s Featured Video

Understanding the diagnostic process for personality disorders is difficult. However, Dr. Ramani makes it simple. Discover how the path to diagnosis should and shouldn’t look & the 7 key criteria used to diagnose avoidant personality disorder.


Things You Need to Know This Week

#1: Here’s How to Forget Bad Memories

New research shows that viewing your memories from a third-person perspective “makes them weaker, decreasing vividness and felt emotion.” Meanwhile, “recalling memories as seen through your own eyes tends to make them stronger.”

This is important to know because this may provide a new way to cope with troubling memories from the past—especially those that are highly emotional.

Triple board-certified neuropsychologist Dr. Judy Ho walks through eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) techniques to process trauma in this video.

Her Expertise: Dr. Judy Ho pairs her powerful work as a neuropsychologist with her deep expertise on traumatic memories to pull back the curtain on EMDR—& how it helps patients work through traumatic memories & find relief. As a neuropsychologist, Dr. Judy is also an expert in the diagnostic process—so truly knows when EMDR would be a good option for a patient.

Source: Psyblog

#2: The Unusual Triggers of Hoarding Happening During COVID-19

New research titled “Hoarding in the age of COVID-19” notes 2 main reasons hoarding behaviors are triggered during the pandemic:

  1. Panic & Anxiety: During stressful & panicky situations, our primal instincts dominate. One of our primal instincts is to hoard in order to survive.
  2. The desire to follow the herd: “We tend to “follow the herd” because we believe others have good reasons for their actions. When people rush to the store to hoard toilet paper, we may do the same which “becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.” We also use herding as a “decision-making shortcut to save us time and cognitive effort.”

With this in mind, it’s important to note that compulsive hoarding is often misrepresented in the media. Its symptoms can vary in severity. It tends to have a chronic course and the variety of signs can be hard to spot—but recovery is possible. Dr. Jenny Yip breaks down what a hoarder’s behaviors may actually look like—not what the media tells us they look like. 

Her Expertise: Dr. Jenny Yip is a clinical psychologist, author, speaker, and nationally recognized OCD and hoarding expert. She is board certified in behavioral & cognitive psychology and is a clinical assistant professor at USC Keck School of Medicine. She is also an institutional member of the International OCD Foundation. She founded the Renewed Freedom Center which provides the most advanced treatment for patients suffering from hoarding, OCD, and other anxiety disorders.

Source: ScienceDaily


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Disclaimer: This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from your healthcare provider. This is only a brief summary of general information. It does NOT include all information about conditions, illnesses, injuries, tests, procedures, treatments, therapies, discharge instructions or lifestyle choices that may apply to you. You must talk with your health care provider for complete information about your health and treatment options. This information should not be used to decide whether or not to accept your health care provider’s advice, instructions or recommendations. Only your health care provider has the knowledge and training to provide advice that is right for you.

You must talk with your health care provider for complete information about your health and treatment options. This information should not be used to decide whether or not to accept your health care provider’s advice, instructions or recommendations. Only your health care provider has the knowledge and training to provide advice that is right for you.

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