August 23, 2020

What to Know: Breaking up with a Narcissist, Combatting Loneliness, Schizoid vs Schizotypal Personality Disorder, & More

by | Aug 23, 2020 | MedCircle Digest

This week, learn what to expect when breaking up with a narcissistic partner, strategies for combatting loneliness, what to know about psychiatric hospitalizations, and more.

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This Week’s Featured Video

Narcissists and their narcissistic abuse can be destabilizing and make you question everything about your relationship. Understanding what it’s like to break up with a narcissist can help you spot the signs that your partner is engaging in narcissistic behavior—and empower you to prevent these behaviors from hurting you.


The 3 Things You Need to Know This Week

#1: The Cure For Loneliness? Apparently It Depends On Your Age:

A new study shows that feelings of loneliness change depending on someone’s stage of life.  A whopping 44% of the 26,000+ adults in the study reported feelings of loneliness. The causes of loneliness were different between the 3 age groups of adults:

Young adults: the strongest link to loneliness was the frequency of contact with friends.

Early middle age: Having a job was significantly associated with lower levels of loneliness. 

Late middle age: Being in a relationship was associated with lower levels of loneliness. 

These factors may be especially evident during COVID-19, which could play into the increased need for mental health services. 

Regardless of the reason for loneliness and regardless of your age, there are strategies and solutions to loneliness that absolutely work. Discover how to work through loneliness & prevent depression with Dr. Sue Varma: 

Her Expertise: Dr. Sue Varma is a board-certified psychiatrist and a Distinguished Fellow of the APA. She has been featured in dozens of high-profile publications during COVID-19, shedding light on what happens in the brain when people feel lonely & how to combat it. She also treats all types of depression, both through therapy and medication. A portion of her work is dedicated to combating the “3 P’s of pessimism” which in turn can majorly improve loneliness.

Source: American Psychiatric Association

#2: The Life-Saving Research on Follow-Up Care to Kids’ Psych Ward Stays:

New research shows the life-saving impact of follow-up care for kids and teenagers who are discharged from psychiatric hospitalization. Those who have another mental health visit within 7 days of leaving hospitalization have a lower risk of suicide for 6 months.  Nearly 140,000 youth on Medicaid were included in the study; 57% received follow-up care. The group who received care faced a 56% decreased risk of suicide.

According to the researchers, “High rates of suicide after psychiatric hospital discharge have persisted and failed to decrease for decades…These findings support existing quality indicators and highlight the need to improve transitions from inpatient to outpatient mental health care.”

Discover how to set your child or teenager up for success at each step of this confusing & overwhelming process in our full series on psychiatric hospitalizations with Dr. Seth Meyers: 

psychiatric hospitalization
https://watch.medcircle.com/psychiatric-hospitalizations/videos/psychiatric-hospitalizations-1

His Expertise: Dr. Seth Meyers is LPS-Designated, which means he can write the application for a psychiatric hold for somebody. This means he must be well-versed in how to observe whether a patient is showing unsafe behaviors & would benefit from hospitalization.  He has worked with countless individuals & families who have had someone they love get admitted for a psychiatric stay.

Source: American Psychiatric Association

#3: Brain Scans for Mental Health Decisions May Not Be So Reliable: 

According to new research, scientists can reach completely different conclusions when it comes to analyzing brain scans. This is a problem because the medical community (as well as researchers) have relied on neuroimaging to understand why the brain gives rise to certain thoughts, emotions, and actions. 

This disparity comes from the fact that different labs use different neuroimaging tools, so they evaluate their findings in different ways. This research shows that to more fully understand the actual structure and function of the brain, scientists and researchers need to work together to validate each other’s research, plus more fully analyze their own research.

Luckily, there are powerful treatments available to transform your thoughts, emotions, and actions—regardless of what they look like in the brain. Our full series on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) sheds a light on how it works, and how you can use its tools & techniques to improve your life:

Her Expertise: Dr. Judy Ho pairs her powerful work as a neuropsychologist with her deep expertise of human behavior to pull back the curtain on CBT & the results you should be seeing (to ensure your own therapist is providing good treatment.) As a neuropsychologist, Dr. Judy is also an expert in the diagnostic process—so truly knows when CBT would be a good option for a patient.

Source: SharpBrains


From the Blog

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Disclaimer: This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from your healthcare provider. This is only a brief summary of general information. It does NOT include all information about conditions, illnesses, injuries, tests, procedures, treatments, therapies, discharge instructions or lifestyle choices that may apply to you. You must talk with your health care provider for complete information about your health and treatment options. This information should not be used to decide whether or not to accept your health care provider’s advice, instructions or recommendations. Only your health care provider has the knowledge and training to provide advice that is right for you.

You must talk with your health care provider for complete information about your health and treatment options. This information should not be used to decide whether or not to accept your health care provider’s advice, instructions or recommendations. Only your health care provider has the knowledge and training to provide advice that is right for you.

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