August 2, 2020

What to Watch: Psychopaths VS Sociopaths, Different Types of Depression, & Diagnosing ADHD

by | Aug 2, 2020 | MedCircle Digest

This week, learn the differences between psychopaths and sociopaths, how different types of depression manifest, the misdiagnosis of ADHD, and more.

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They Often Get Confused & Misdiagnosed

There is a ton of education out there about major depressive disorder (MDD). This is the mental health condition most people are referring to when they talk about depression. However, there are many subtypes of depression that most people don’t know about; low-grade depression (also known as persistent depressive disorder or dysthymia) is one of them. In this video, Dr. Judy helps you discover the differences between MDD and PDD, how to spot them, & how to talk to your mental health provider about whether you are diagnosed with the right one.

*Taken from “Alternate Types of Depression: Get the Right Diagnosis”


Are Psychopaths & Sociopaths Born or Made?

antisocial personality disorder

Psychopaths are often confused for sociopaths, and vice versa. While many of the behaviors look the same, there are important differences you need to know—including the differences between the triggers of psychopathic or sociopathic tendencies. Dr. Ramani delivers clear-cut information in this compelling interview.

*Taken from “ASPD: Psychopaths, Sociopaths, & How to Spot Them


The Diagnosis Is Only as Good as the Clinician

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is often overdiagnosed in certain age groups, and underdiagnosed in others. Clearly, the misconceptions around ADHD are widespread. Dr. Dom Sportelli is a double board-certified child & adolescent psychiatrist who diagnoses and treats ADHD almost every day. In this enlightening interview, he shares what most people get wrong about a new ADHD diagnosis, and how the right mental health provider can make all the difference.

*Taken from “Navigating the Ambiguity of ADHD”


From The MedCircle Blog


Mental Health News

A Surprising Way to Benefit Your Mental Health:

New research shows that the pursuit of short-term pleasurable activities—like relaxing on the couch or enjoying a delicious meal—can actually help your mental health, even if they don’t contribute to your long-term goals. We tend to think everything we do should impact long-term outcomes, but the research shows that taking time to mindlessly relax contributes just as much to a happy and successful life as self-control does.

What to Know About the Changing Landscape of Mental Health Care:

Daybreak Health is working with a team of 10 trained mental health clinicians to provide online therapy for teenagers amid the pandemic’s mental health crisis. The effort is focused on treating teenagers ages 13 to 19 in the San Francisco Bay area, and the cost of care is currently covered by insurance or through an $89 per-week fee. They hope that these teenagers will be able to develop coping mechanisms in order to better respond to mental health pressures as adults.

What to Know During Back-to-School Uncertainty: 

Here’s what a psychologist says kids should focus on in order to maintain their mental health amid the uncertainty of going back to school during COVID-19.


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Disclaimer: This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from your healthcare provider. This is only a brief summary of general information. It does NOT include all information about conditions, illnesses, injuries, tests, procedures, treatments, therapies, discharge instructions or lifestyle choices that may apply to you. You must talk with your health care provider for complete information about your health and treatment options. This information should not be used to decide whether or not to accept your health care provider’s advice, instructions or recommendations. Only your health care provider has the knowledge and training to provide advice that is right for you.

You must talk with your health care provider for complete information about your health and treatment options. This information should not be used to decide whether or not to accept your health care provider’s advice, instructions or recommendations. Only your health care provider has the knowledge and training to provide advice that is right for you.

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